Home > Blog August 31, 2021

Many of us pack a toiletry bag or an “emergency change of clothes” bag, but we may not think to prioritize our sleep while traveling. This is where packing a travel sleep kit comes in handy. A travel sleep kit is full of things that can help you snooze better while you’re out of town.

travel napper bag

7 Accessories To Improve Your Sleep While Traveling


So what do we consider our sleep travel kit essentials? Here are seven items to help you get the best rest when you’re away from home:

1. Eyemask & Blue Light Glasses

Blue light cutting eyeglasses block the stimulating blue light that is emitted from our phones and screens. This blue light can stimulate the brain and make it difficult to fall asleep. When scrolling your phone or watching a movie during your trip, be sure to pop on your blue light glasses, so you have less difficulty falling asleep.

An eye mask can help block out unwanted light on a plane, train, or even in your hotel. Darkness, even from an eye mask, can help cue in our body’s circadian rhythm and help us get sleepy. Try using an eye mask when adjusting to a new time zone and getting ready to nap at irregular times for your body.

2. Earplugs

Have you ever been in a hotel room that's right next to the elevator or ice machine? If so, you know noise can hamper a good night's sleep. Grab a pair of squishy foam earplugs, twist them, pop them in, and call it a night!

3. Cozy Socks and Sleepwear

Our bodies sleep better in a cooler room, but cold feet can keep us awake. Find the best of both worlds by keeping the room at a cooler temperature and wearing lightweight cotton sleepwear. Then slip into a pair of cozy cotton socks. This helps your body stay at that Goldilocks temperature – just right. And your sleep will be just right, too!

4. Water Bottle

Remember to drink water. Keeping your own water bottle with you ensures you will always have a sip nearby during your trip. Staying hydrated helps keep our body in equilibrium, allowing us to get better sleep.

5. Room Spray

If you are in your room, try using a relaxing room spray, such as lavender, cedarwood, or rosemary. These scents not only smell delightful and help you take deep, relaxing breaths, but research shows they can help improve sleep quality. Use this routine at home before your excursion to get your body clued into the sense memory of preparing for sleep.

girl in car with blanket

6. Weighted Blanket

Traveling may make us feel anxious. For that, a weighted blanket can help. A travel weighted blanket applies gentle deep touch pressure, which can help relieve anxiety and make you feel relaxed. It can also help keep the chill of recirculated air off of you, allowing you to feel cozy and calm.

Your go-to weighted blanket may be too heavy to lug around during your travel. Instead, take a travel weighted blanket with you. This is different from a regular weighted blanket because it is slightly smaller and weighs around 10lbs for convenient calm on the go.

Having a familiar blanket to cuddle up in when you’re in a hotel or rental house can help you relax more quickly, giving your body “home” like cues.

7. Travel Pillow

No one likes to wake up with a stiff neck. Prevent a head-turning neck cramp by packing a travel pillow. Whether you prefer a horseshoe-shaped pillow, an inflatable table pillow, or a padded hoodie, find a comfortable way to rest your head and wake up without pain.

girl with blanket lake

7 Must-Haves For Your Sleep Travel Kit

Planes, trains, and cars can get you from here to there at different speeds but have one thing in common: it’s hard to sleep while traveling. Improve your chances of getting better rest with these items in your sleep travel kit.


Bearassentials

Travel sleep kits are just as important to pack as your toiletry bag or medicine bag.


Masks, weighted blankets, earplugs, and calming sprays are easy to pack and can help you relax while traveling.


Maintaining a sleep routine at home that you can replicate while away can help you get the best rest.

Did you know?
High altitude affects the oxygen level in the sleep center of the brain and can explain why many people have difficulty resting while air traveling. (Well, that and the discomfort of the middle seat, of course!)